Adam Schembri
  • Constituent order in Serbian Sign Language
Adrian Leemann
  • Poster Session
  • Noun plural marking in Swiss German – a system in change?
  • Selecting representative survey sites from a large-scale dialectological study: A comparison of clustering methods
Agnes Kim
  • Poster Session
  • The Central European Linguistic Area in the making – Diachronic perspectives on selected constructions
Agurtzane Elordui

Basque Language and Communication Department
NOR Research Group
University of the Basque Country

  • Stylistic management of Basque variation in Instagram: is there a weakening of standard language ideology?
Aini Li

Aini Li is a graduate student in Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests are mainly concerned with sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics, with a particular interest in the production and perception of language variation.

  • The role of social meaning in the emergence of indexicality
Aivars Glaznieks

Aivars is a senior researcher at the Institute for Applied Linguistics of Eurac Research Bozen/Bolzano. His research focuses on sociolinguistic aspects of the use of registers in CMC. He has been responsible for the creation of the multilingual CMC corpus DiDi, a corpus linguistic collection of facebook texts of writers from the multilingual Italian province of South Tyrol. Currently, he is working on the description of written German dialect varieties in CMC. As he always needs more authentic data for his work, he is happy to collect new data whenever possible in order to produce and analyse new corpora!

He has worked on the creation of several learner corpora in recent years, such as LEONIDE and KoKo, and combines writing research and corpus linguistics in his research activities.

Aivars is also the managing editor for the new Eurac Research Learner Corpus Platform PORTA.

  • Dialect or not? How to identify the use of dialect in written online communication
Aleksej Tikhonov

Aleksej Tikhonov is a researcher of the Department of Slavonic and Hungarian Studies at the Humboldt University of Berlin. He completed his Ph.D. on the linguistic author identification of Rixdorf manuscripts in summer 2020 and defended his dissertation in spring 2021. His research interests are East and West Slavonic languages, corpus linguistics, digital humanities, (semi-)automatic text recognition, Slavonic languages in German popular music in the 21st century, linguistic integration of minorities, and multilingual language contact in urban areas. Since spring 2021 Aleksej Tikhonov is working as PostDoc of the UK-German Collaborative Research Project “The History of Pronominal Subjects in the Languages of Northern Europe” between the Humboldt University of Berlin (head: Roland Meyer) and the University of Oxford (head: David Willis).

  • Influencers, rappers, politicians, or what's authentic internet register? A study on Polish and Czech YouTube comments
Alessandro Vietti
  • Mid vowels at the crossroads between standard and regional Italian
Alexander Geyken
  • A corpus for research on diatopic variation in Standard German: Design and user interface of the ZDL-Regionalkorpus
Alexander Glück
  • Dialect or not? How to identify the use of dialect in written online communication
Alexander Werth
  • Introduction
Alexandra Engel
  • The future of register studies: A case study on the role of register in the choice of future markers in English
Alexandra N. Lenz

... is Professor of German Linguistics at the Department of German Studies at University of Vienna, Director of the Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ACHD-CH) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and Speaker of the FWF Special Research Programme (SFB) ‘German in Austria. Variation – Contact –Perception’ (F60).

Research focuses on phonetic-phonological, lexical, and syntactic variation as well as on language attitudes and perception.

Publications: https://www.univie.ac.at/germanistik/alexandra-n-lenz/
Special Research Programm 'German in Austria': https://www.dioe.at/en/

  • Discussion 'Standard Language in Austria: Towards a new agenda (with language users taking the lead)
Alfred Lameli
  • Differences in vowel quantity among German Dialects
Amanda Cole

I am a sociolinguist at the University of Essex. I research language variation and change as well as language attitudes with a focus on social class and the accents in South East England.

  • Language attitudes towards speech stimuli and geographic locations in South East England: Britain’s hierarchy of accents continues to disadvantage the working class and/or ethnic minority speakers.
Amelie Dorn
  • Austrian ‘shibboleths’ – Analyses on language use, attitudes and perception
Anastasia Makarova
  • Degrees of non-standardness. Feature-based analysis of variation in a Torlak dialect corpus
Anca Bibiri

PhD in Philology (2009), is a Researcher at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Department, “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University of Iaşi. She is author and co-author of talks presented at national and international conferences; member of the Romanian Society of Dialectology and member of Société de Linguistique Romane and EUROPHRAS. Postdoctoral fellow in linguistics (2010-2013). Fields of interest: prosody, computational linguistics, phonetics and dialectology, natural language processing, lexicography. Co-editor of the PHSS Proceedings (2014-2019).

  • Poster Session
Andreas Nolda
  • A corpus for research on diatopic variation in Standard German: Design and user interface of the ZDL-Regionalkorpus
Andrin Büchler
  • Becoming local: the role of strong ties in long-term accommodation
Anja Wittibschlager

... is currently a doctoral student at the German Department of the University of Vienna, Austria.
Main research interests: variationist linguistics and sociolinguistics with a focus on the linguistic levels of (morpho-)syntax and pragmatics

  • (Standard) German in Austria: Areal-horizontal and vertical-social variation ‘on the ground’
  • Introduction
Ann-Marie Moser

https://www.ds.uzh.ch/p/moser2

  • Language change and language variation in relative clause formation: evidence from (Early) New High German
Anna Pineda

My main research lines focus on Catalan language and its variation, both synchronic and diachronic, especially in the realm of syntax. In this regard, comparison with other Romance languages (Spanish, French, Italian, Aragonese, Asturian, Occitan) is also paramount in my studies. Finally, I am also interested in the comparison and contrast between Romance languages and a typologically unralted language such as Basque.

At the moment I am a postdoctoral researcher at Sorbonne Université (Paris) and, since June 2021, I am also enjoying a Humboldt Fellowpship for Senior Researchers, which allows me to develop my research project Differential Object Marking in Catalan at Universität zu Köln (Germany). Before that, I was a researcher and teacher at Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, with a postdoctoral fellowship Juan de la Cierva-incorporación, provided by the Spanish Government (years 2018 and 2019), I worked at the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique in Bayonne, with a 2-year postdoctoral fellowship Beatriu de Pinós provided by the Generalitat of Catalonia (years 2016 and 2017), and I also spent two months as a visiting scholar at the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (2017).

  • Differential object marking in Catalan: emergence and expansion from Old Catalan to nowadays
Anne-France Pinget
  • Poster Session
Anne-Sophie Ghyselen

I am a postdoctoral researcher at the linguistics department of Ghent University. My research focuses on language variation and change in the Dutch language area, generally adopting a quantitative, multivariate, sociolinguistic perspective and integrating both production and perception data. My PhD dissertation (Ghent University, 2016) addressed the question how spoken Dutch in Flanders – with its wide diversity of dialects, standard language and intermediate language varieties – is structured and how it is evolving. As postdoctoral assistant at Ghent University (2016-2019), I further explored the question of linguistic systematicity and I started working on the development of ‘a parsed corpus of spoken Dutch dialects’ (with Anne Breitbarth, Jacques Van Keymeulen and Melissa Farasyn). From 1 October 2019 onwards, I am running a project, funded by the Flemish Research Foundation (senior postdoctoral fellowship, host institutions: Ghent University and KULeuven), comparing covariance patterns in spoken Surinamese and Belgian Dutch, to test the validity of theoretical models characterising language communities on the basis of the presence or absence of systematic covariance. Since October 2019, I am also co-supervising the concerted research project Productivity@work.

  • Identifying ‘varieties’ of Dutch: theory, methods, and perspectives
Annette D'Onofrio

... is Assistant Professor of Linguistics at Northwestern University in Illinois, USA. Her research aims to examine how sociolinguistic styles are produced, perceived, and represented cognitively, and how they are connected with social constructs like personae. She also founded and co-leads the Chicagoland Language Project, studying linguistic variation and change across varied sociohistorical contexts in the Chicago area.

  • Sound change reversal in context: Insights from production and perception
Aria Adli

see www.ariaadli.com

  • Local person referents and the role of politeness: Comparing variable subject pronouns in Spanish and Persian
Ariana Bancu

I am an assistant professor at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, USA. My research interests are in the areas of Language Contact, Multilingualism, Language Variation and Change, Grammatical Transfer, Documentation of Endangered Languages. I explore theoretical questions related to grammatical transfer and to factors influencing transfer in cases of trilingualism. I work with a community of Transylvanian Saxon speakers, an endangered Germanic language from Romania. I draw on methodologies from language contact and variationist sociolinguistics to explore: - How the dominant language in a community affects changes in the minority language - Whether the same contact-induced transfer phenomena occur in different sociolinguistic settings - The factors that influence the directionality of transfer (e.g. typological similarities, language dominance)

  • Category-specific conjunctions in a European minority language
Arne Dhondt

I am a PhD student and teaching assistant in Dutch linguistics at Ghent University. My PhD project focuses on how national variation within the grammar of Standard Dutch can be systematically investigated on the basis of corpus data and how this variation can be described from a pluricentric perspective in a reference grammar. The project is connected to the revision of the Algemene Nederlandse Spraakkunst, the main reference grammar of Standard Dutch.

  • Revising the Algemene Nederlandse Spraakkunst: a typology of national variation in the grammar of Standard Dutch
Augusto Soares da Silva

Augusto Soares da Silva is Full Professor of Linguistics at the Faculty of Philosophy and Social Sciences of the Catholic University of Portugal. His research focuses on lexical semantics, grammar and conceptualization, and language variation and change within the framework of Cognitive Linguistics, adopting an empirical, usage-based approach. He is also interested in metaphor, ideology and discourse. He is the author of more than a hundred articles and many books on cognitive semantics, construction grammar, language pluricentricity, semantic change and the relationships between language, cognition and society. His book O Mundo dos Sentidos em Português: Polissemia, Semântica e Cognição (‘The World of Meanings in Portuguese: Polysemy, Semantics and Cognition’, 2006) won an international award from the Portuguese Language Society. More recently, he edited the book Pluricentricity: Language Variation and Sociocognitive Dimensions (Berlin/Boston, Mouton de Gruyter, 2014). He now coordinates two research projects on the comparison of European and Brazilian Portuguese: Lexical and Grammatical Convergence and Divergence, and Conceptualization of Emotions. He is a member of the scientific committee of various national and international journals as well as of the Societas Linguistica Europaea and of the International Cognitive Linguistics Association. He is the director of the Center for Philosophical and Humanistic Studies and coordinator of the Communications Sciences course and the PhD program in Linguistics.

For more information, see
https://www.cienciavitae.pt/portal/en/C616-AA28-B019

  • Standardization in Portuguese: pan-lusophone or pluricentric codification?
Azler Garcia

While doing my BA in English Studies at the Univeristy of the Basque Country (Spain), I interned for the research group The Bilingual Mind, where I specialised in experimental design and language processing. I completed my MA in Linguistics at Leiden University (The Netherlands), where I was an assistant at the Sociolinguistic Series talks. There, I received extensive trainig in sociolinguistics, language variation, and data-gathering methods. I am now a PhD student at the Department Linguistics and Basque Studies at the Univeristy of the Basque Country, and I focus on how language attitudes and the degree of language contact may influence dialect levelling in Western Basque.

  • Social correlates of variation in a rural Basque town: Investigating Regional Dialect Levelling and language attitudes
Balázs Sinkovics
  • Continuity or discontinuity in dialect use: When the speech of the son is more dialectal than his mother’s
Barbara Sonnenhauser
  • Degrees of non-standardness. Feature-based analysis of variation in a Torlak dialect corpus
Barbara Soukup

Barbara Soukup is Assistant Professor for the Sociolinguistics of German in Austria at the University of Vienna’s Department of German Studies. She received her Mphil in English and French studies from the University of Vienna, and her MSc and PhD in linguistics from Georgetown University in Washington, DC, with a specialization in sociolinguistics. A central theme in her research and teaching is the strategic, agentive use of linguistic variation (the various styles/ dialects/ languages available to speakers in their repertoires) for purposes of rhetorical goals and interactional meaning-making, such as the construction of interactional identities, messages, and relationships. In this, she draws on and integrates theory and methodology from across all sociolinguistic sub-disciplines, notably from variationist sociolinguistics, interactional sociolinguistics, social psychology of language (language attitude study), linguistic landscape study, cognitive sociolinguistics, folk linguistics, and perceptual dialectology. A major concern of hers is to theorize and analyze language bottom-up, from the perspective of its users, in pursuit of a truly ‘applied’ linguistics. In 2014, she was awarded an Austrian Science Fund Elise-Richter research fellowship for the project “ELLViA – English in the Linguistic Landscape of Vienna, Austria” (FWF#V394), investigating patterns of occurrence and interactional functions of English language use in written public discourse.

  • “Panel Introduction: How to deal with ‘standard language’ in Austria (and elsewhere)”
Beat Siebenhaar
  • Life span change – insights from a panel study in East Middle German
Benedikt Szmrecsanyi
  • Grammatical variation and, uh, cognitive load: Not so correlated
Berta Badia-Barrera
  • Poster Session
Bianca Sell
  • Poster Session
Carina Steiner
  • Poster Session
  • Selecting representative survey sites from a large-scale dialectological study: A comparison of clustering methods
Carina Steiner
  • Noun plural marking in Swiss German – a system in change?
Carla Amorós-Negre

Carla Amorós Negre is Ph.D in Linguistics and Tenured Professor at the University of Salamanca in the General Linguistics Area (Spanish Linguistics Department). Her main areas of scholarly interest include Language Policy and Planning, Sociolinguistics, Applied Linguistics, Foreign Language Teaching and Learning and Anthropological Linguistics She has been a visiting researcher in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences in the University of Edinburgh and in Fachbereich 10: Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften in the University of Bremen. She is the director of the Máster Universitario en Lengua y Cultura Hispánicas (MULCH). Carla Amorós has participated in funded research projects, such as La prescripción manifiesta y la prescripción encubierta en la gramática española contemporánea. Actitudes normativas y usos lingüísticos (HUM2005-03774); Innovation and Development of Spanish as a Foreign Language (IDELE) (530459-TEMPUS-1-2012-1-ES-TEMPUS-JPCR) and E-Learning Novelties towards the Goal of a Universal Acquisition of foreign and Second Languages (2015-1-ES01-KA203-015743).

  • Panel's Introduction
Carlota de Benito Moreno

... is Assistant Professor of Language and Space in Ibero-Romance at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. As a dialectologist, she focusses on morphosyntactic variation in Spanish and other Ibero-Romance languages, using a broad range of data types, from rural spoken language to written texts found on social media such as Twitter.

  • Never have I ever changed my syntactic system
Carmen Llamas
  • Pronoun exchange in the North East of England: Localised patterns in production and perception
Catherine Travis
  • Frequency and the role of constructions in variable subject expression
Cesko Voeten
  • Poster Session
  • A comparison of contemporary normalization methods for time-dynamic vowels
Charles Webster

I currently serve as the Director of the German Basic Language Program and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My research fields include language and migration and language acquisition during study abroad. I am currently in Vienna, visiting the "Illinois in Vienna Programs", a study abroad experience offered by my institution.

  • Language Variation in L2 German Learning: A Case Study of a Sociolinguistics Course on Austrian German
Chiara Celata
  • Lexical frequency effects in Italian VOT: Minority vs. Majority language effects
Chiara Meluzzi

I am currently a Post Doc and contract professor at University of Pavia, where I teach 'Phonetics and Phonology' for the MA in Linguistics.
I'm the team leader of the project CoLIMBi (Corpus of Language, Identity and Migration in Biella) which involves many of my former and actual students, together with schools and institutions in Biella (Italy).
My main research interests involve sociophonetics, language variation and change, and sociopragmatics.

  • Internal migrations and linguistic stereotypes in Italian schoolchildren
  • Poster Session
Chloé Vincent

Chloé Vincent is a research assistant in the French team of the international research project "Decoding Antisemitism: An AI-driven Study on Hate Speech and Imagery Online". In 2020 she graduated from the MA Sociolinguistics at Queen Mary University of London. Her dissertation focussed on the self-evaluation of French regional languages. She is especially interested in covert manifestation of discriminations in language.

  • Self-evaluation of French regional accents and changing prestige
Christa Schneider
  • The Structure of Diatopic Variations in the Lithuanian Language
Christian Ilbury
  • U Ok Hun?: The Digital commodification of White Woman Style
Christian Paga
  • Poster Session
Christina Mutter

...is project coordinator of the Digital Humanities project VerbaAlpina of Munich University (https://www.verba-alpina.gwi.uni-muenchen.de/). Main research interests: dialectology, geolinguistics, minority languages, neologisms, sociolinguistics, language contact.

  • The FAIR Principles - an important challenge to variational linguistics
Christine Graeppi
  • Poster Session
Christoph Purschke

per aspera ad acta

  • Standardization in practice? Individual norm adaptation in Luxembourgish online news comments
Claire Childs

Lecturer in English Language and Linguistics, University of York

  • Pronoun exchange in the North East of England: Localised patterns in production and perception
Claudia Crocco

Ghent University

  • The intonation of neighboring varieties in Campania
Costas Mourlas
  • Variation with and without prescriptivism: The case of the Greek word for ‘coronavirus’
Célia Richy
  • Southern French and performance of competence and localness in political speech
Daniel Duran
  • Register Differences in Vowel Dispersion in Formal and Informal Situations
Daniela Mereu
  • Mid vowels at the crossroads between standard and regional Italian
David Britain

David Britain has been Professor of Modern English Linguistics at the University of Bern since 2010. His research interests embrace language variation and change, varieties of English (especially in East Anglia and Southern England, the Southern Hemisphere, especially New Zealand, Australia and the Falkland Islands and the Pacific, especially Micronesia), dialect contact and attrition, new dialect formation, second dialect acquisition, dialect ideologies and the use of new technologies, such as smartphone applications, in collecting dialect data. He is also actively engaged in research at the dialectology-human geography interface, especially with respect to space/place, urban/rural (especially language ideologies about, and media representations of the rural, and how these reinforce stereotypes about rural dialects) and the role of mobilities (especially with respect to dialect transmission, dialect diffusion, new dialect formation, dialect levelling and attrition, and dialectological fieldwork).

  • Beyond the NP-Pro constraint: factors governing the use of third person present tense zero in Norwich English
David Gschösser
  • Historical Dialect Dictionaries and Their Corpora as Data Basis for Language Variation – a Multimedia Tour of the WBÖ and its Research Platform LIÖ
David Hornsby

I've worked for thirty years at the University of Kent, where I've been, at various times, Head of French, Russian, and English Language and Linguistics. My first love, however, is French: as a sociolinguist I've worked on dialect death and the emergence of regional French varieties in the north, and more recently on the variable phenomenon of liaison, which involves variable realization of normally silent word-final consonants (e.g. in 'pas [z/Ø] encore'). Generally though I'm interested in anything that gives me an excuse to go back to France!

  • Gender and Liaison in French: a Paradox within a Paradox?
Dimitra Melissaropoulou

https://qa.auth.gr/en/cv/dmelissa
http://cappadocian.upatras.gr/en/project/research-team

  • Detecting spatial effects of contact-induced vs. language-internal variation: a dialectometric approach to Cappadocian Greek
Dimitris Papazachariou
  • Insights into the development of lateral palatalization from the Greek of Greek-Canadians
Dominic Watt
  • Pronoun exchange in the North East of England: Localised patterns in production and perception
  • Quantifying the non-standardness of British English accents using human- and computer-based inter-sample distance metrics
Dominik Wallner
  • ‘Horizontal’ and ‘vertical’ varietal structures in Western Austria
Dong Nguyen
  • What can big data tell us about the social meaning of language variation? A case study on socially meaningful spelling variation in English
Dragana Raicevic Bajic

I am a PhD researcher working on constituent order in Serbian Sign Language at Ghent University. Since September 2021 I have been working at the Belgrade Deaf Organisation. Together with deaf colleagues we have set up the first Serbian Sign Language course at A1 level at the Faculty of Philology University of Belgrade.

  • Constituent order in Serbian Sign Language
Eivind Torgersen
  • Teachers’ views on perceived non-standard features in L2 English among young Norwegian learners
Eliane Lorenz

Eliane Lorenz is a senior lecturer (Akademische Rätin a.Z) at the Chair of English Linguistics (Prof. Mukherjee) at Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany. In addition, she holds a post-doctoral position in English linguistics and multilingualism at the Department of Teacher Education at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway, as part of the project 'The Acquisition of English in the Multilingual Classroom' (AcEngMulCla). In 2019, she completed her PhD in English Linguistics at the University of Hamburg, Germany.

  • Teachers’ views on perceived non-standard features in L2 English among young Norwegian learners
Eline Zenner
  • On the emergence and development of English as a youth language marker
  • Poster Session
Emanuele Miola
  • The new 'ne': an ongoing restandardization process in contemporary Italian
Eric Mijts

Eric Mijts studied Linguistics and Literature at the University of Antwerp and is specialized in sociolinguistics. In 2000 he joined the University of Aruba where he works as researcher and lecturer in skills and linguistics as well as an initiator of educational innovation and multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research programs. As a researcher he is affiliated to the University of Antwerp and Ghent University. He coordinates the Academic Foundation Year, the UAUCU student research exchange and he is a founding member of the SISSTEM program (Sustainable Island Solutions through Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). His research and publications focus on multilingualism, language policy and planning, education for sustainable development and inclusion/exclusion processes.

  • Global English, Kingdom Dutch and the national language: (De)selecting languages in higher education in the southern Dutch Caribbean
Esther Jahns

I am a postdoctoral researcher at the Universität Oldenburg.
My research field is sociolinguistics/linguistic anthropology with a focus on language ideologies and the social meaning of variation.
I am especially interested in how speakers exploit their (multi)linguistic repertoire to make meaning and present at the ICLaVE 11 a study on Jewish speakers in today's Berlin.

  • Diglossic translanguaging: How Jewish speakers in Berlin perceive and explain their linguistic choices
Eugen Unterberger

2014-2018 German studies education;
2018: Study assistant;
2018-2019: Project staff "Variantengrammatik des Deutschen";
2019-now: Project staff "Sprachliche Vielfalt verstehen" & "InterRed";
2021: Winner of "Salzburger Regionalitätspreis 2021" for the project "InterRed"

  • Can language attitudes be changed through German lessons? An intervention study in Salzburg and the adjacent Bavaria.
Eva Wittenberg
  • Connecting variationist lexicography, grammatology, and psycholinguistics
Evangelia Daskalaki
  • On the cusp: Greek language maintenance and postvernacularity in Western Canada
Florin-Teodor Olariu

I am senior researcher at the Department of Dialectology and Sociolinguistics, the “A. Philippide” Institute of Romanian Philology – the Iasi Branch of the Romanian Academy. My areas of competence: Romanian dialectology, sociolinguistics (sociolinguistics of migration, sociolinguistic minorities), geolinguistics (computerization of linguistic cartography) and pragmalinguistics (conversation analysis, sociopragmatics).

  • The Audio-Visual Linguistic Atlas of Bukovina (ALAB) – a multidimensional platform for analising Romanian dialectal variation
Francesca Nicora

I am currently a part-time teaching assistant in Italian at the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) and a research assistant to the onLIne Language leArning and teaChing (LILAC) project, directed by Dr. Laura McLoughlin.

I have recently completed my Structured-PhD degree in Italian Studies from National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) under the supervision of Dr. Anne O'Connor (NUI Galway) and Dr. Laura McLoughlin (NUI Galway) and with the additional supervision of Dr. Barbara Gili Fivela (Università del Salento, Lecce). The PhD project entitled "Prosodic training in foreign language: a study with Hiberno-English learners of Italian" has been chosen as the winner of the IRAAL (Irish Association for Applied Linguistics) postgraduate award in 2019. Later, the European Doctorate Award was conferred in April 2020.

My research interests include second language prosody acquisition, phonetics and phonology with particular focus on intonation and pragmatics (Irish-English and Italian varieties), corpus linguistics, audiovisual translation in language teaching and learning (subtitling and re-voicing), e-learning & e-teaching and technologies in language teaching.

  • Poster Session
François Conrad
  • Lexical variation in a nutshell: The sociolinguistics of Luxembourgish football language
Gabriela Bart

University of Zurich, Schweizerdeutsches Wörterbuch Zurich

  • Adnominal possession in Swiss German with a special focus on the highest Alemannic dialect of the Lötschental
Gareth Roberts
  • The role of social meaning in the emergence of indexicality
Gediminas Schüppenhauer
  • Register Differences in Vowel Dispersion in Formal and Informal Situations
Gintare Gelunaite-Malinauskiene

I was born in Lithuania, in Kaunas. I have been employed at Vytautas Magnus University since 2005, and at the moment I’m PhD student at the Faculty of Humanities. My participation in international project work, seminars, trainings and conferences acquired multicultural communication experience and coped with cross-cultural differences successfully. My Bachelor studies (German Philology, 2006) and Master studies (Business communication in German, 2008) gave me a new possibility to adapt to interesting situations. During the studies I worked as a translator (German-Lithuanian) in the negotiations and trainings. This experience gave me the possibility to see the aspects of the business cultural communication.

  • Poster Session
Giuseppe Magistro

Giuseppe Magistro is a doctoral researcher at Ghent University for FWO. His research is mainly based on dialectal pragmatic items at the interfaces.

  • ‘Wel’ is doing well: competition in the West Flemish community of practice
Gorka Basterretxea Santiso

Gorka Basterretxea Santiso is a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics who joined the Spanish and Portuguese Department at Georgetown University in 2018. His main interests include sociolinguistics, dialectology, language contact and variation, and bilingualism. Originally from the Basque Country, he completed his B.A. in English Studies at Universidad de Salamanca (2016) and M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics at Illinois State University (2018). He also holds a M.S. in Hispanic Linguistics at Georgetown University. He completed a study abroad program at Trinity College Dublin during his third year of the B.A. Gorka is also the Assistant Director in the Spanish Language Program for the intermediate level and he is involved at Georgetown as the co-chair for the annual conference GRAPHSY 2021 and the founder of the Basque Coffee Hour (Euskeraren ordua).

  • Poster Session
Gregory R. Guy

Gregory R. Guy is Professor of Linguistics at New York University; his research focuses on social, geographic, and diachronic diversity in language, and the implications of linguistic variation for the construction of linguistic theory. He has done original research on variation and change in varieties of English, Spanish, and Portuguese, and on the African influences on language in Latin America. His current work addresses the coherence of lects, advancing cross-cultural sociolinguistics, and variation and change in the use of null subjects in Portuguese dialects. He previously held faculty positions at Sydney, Stanford, Cornell, and York (Canada), and has been a visiting professor or invited lecturer at universities in Brazil, Britain, Ireland, New Zealand, Germany, and the Netherlands. His publications include Towards a Social Science of Language (Benjamins, 1995, 1996), and Sociolingüística Quantitativa: Instrumental de Análise (Parábola, 2007). As a life-long activist for social diversity and human rights, he has served on professional, municipal, and national panels addressing issues of disability, inclusion, and accessibility in higher education and in the workplace, and on the promotion of linguistic human rights.

  • Discussion
  • Null subjects in Brazil and Portugal: dialect comparison as a window to diachrony
Gunhild Kværness
  • "My dialect is awesome!" - Dialect attitudes among lower secondary school pupils in Hedmark, Norway
Gunther De Vogelaer
  • Identifying ‘varieties’ of Dutch: theory, methods, and perspectives
Göz Kaufmann

Göz Kaufmann, who obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Heidelberg, Germany, in 1997,
completed his habilitation treatise in 2016 and received the "venia legendi" in German
Linguistics from the University of Freiburg, Germany. He holds a permanent position as a senior
lecturer ('Akademischer Oberrat') for linguistics in the German Department of the University of
Freiburg. Kaufmann’s main research areas are sociolinguistics, language contact, language
variation, and language change. In the area of language variation and change, his focus is on
German minority varieties spoken in South America, particularly Mennonite Low German and
Pomerano. Aside from lexical and morphological variation, he analyzes syntactic variation in these
varieties combining variationist and generative approaches.

  • Past counterfactuals in Pomerano: A privileged view into clausal cartography
Hans Van de Velde

Hans Van de Velde is chair of sociolinguistics at Utrecht University and senior researcher at the Fryske Akademy in Leeuwarden/Ljouwert (the Netherlands), where he organised ICLaVE|10. He is a specialist in language variation and change, sociophonetics and standardization processes and worked a lot on regional variation in Dutch and on the characteristics of /r/. At the Fryske Akademy he researches the Frisian minority language, Dutch and the mixed varieties spoken in the Fryslân province. He is also responsible for the digital research infrastructure for Frisian and the development of Frisian language tools, such as the online Dutch-Frisian dictionary, spell checkers, automatic translation and speech recognition.

  • Poster Session
  • A comparison of contemporary normalization methods for time-dynamic vowels
Heike Ortner
  • Variation and Belonging. The Use of Variation in Tourism for Indicating Forms of Belonging
Henrique Monteagudo

Henrique Monteagudo is Professor of Galician and Portuguese Philology at the University of Santiago de Compostela and researcher at the Instituto da Lingua Galega. He has taught at the universities of Birmingham (UK), City University of New York (CUNY), Coimbra, Lisbon (UL), Buenos Aires (UBA), California (UC-Santa Barbara), São Paulo (USP), Federal Fluminense (Niterói) and Universidad de la República (Montevideo). He has dealt with the social history of the Galician language, sociolinguistics and glotopolitics. He directed the project "The process of normalization of the Galician language, 1980-2000", that resulted in the publication of three volumes (2002-2003) and a series of studies on surveys on the evolution of the Galician sociolinguistic situation: A sociedade galega e o idioma (1992-2003) (2005), A evolución sociolingüística (1992-2008) (2011), Lingua e sociedade en Galicia. A evolución sociolingüística 1992-2013 (2017). He has been the editor of volumes such as Estudios de Sociolingüística Galega (1995), Norma Lingüística e Variación (2005), Sociedades multilingües: da identidade á diversidade (2009), Galego e Português Brasileiro: história, variação, mudança (2012), Lingua(s), sociedade e política. Un debate multidisciplinar (2012), Contacto de linguas, hibridade, cambio: contextos, procesos e consecuencias (2013). He has published Historia social da lingua galega (1999, 2nd ed. 2017).

  • Panel's Introduction
Holly Dann

I am a sociolinguist broadly interested in sociophonetic variation and change. More specifically, I am interested in combining production and perception methodologies to explore the social meaning of accent features. My PhD explored linguistic variation in West Cornwall, England, with a focus on how rurality influences the progress of sound change in the region. I am currently a Research Associate on the Manchester Voices Project (https://www.manchestervoices.org/) at Manchester Metropolitan University.

  • Social Meaning in Archival Interaction: A mixed-methods analysis of variation in rhoticity and past tense BE in Oldham
ICLaVE|11

11–14 April 2022, ONLINE

  • Opening Ceremony
ILIA UCHITEL

In 2015 Ilia Uchitel graduated from Saint Petersburg State University at the Department of General Linguistics with majors in Yiddish and Slavistics. In 2018 he completed his master's degree at the Higher School of Economics in Moscow at the School of Linguistics.

In 2014-2018 he also worked as a school and university teacher of English.

Currently, Ilia Uchitel is employed as a research assistant at the University of Jena.

His interests include Yiddish and Ukrainian language dialectology, Corpus linguistics and historical newspapers digitization.

  • Variation in particles used in Yes/No questions in Ukrainian language and factors impacting it.
Ian Cushing

Ian is a Senior Lecturer in English and Education at Edge Hill University, UK, with research interest in language policy and ideologies in schools.

  • ‘Word gaps’, raciolinguistic ideologies and the re-normalisation of deficit discourses in England’s schools
Iker Salaberri

You can find details concerning my biography in my Orcid ID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3859-4011

  • Diachrony of Basque negation: analogy, potentiality and word order change
Isabeau De Smet

Isabeau De Smet is a postdoc at QLVL (KU Leuven).

  • Does 'he dived' take longer than 'he dove'? An experimental approach to iconicity in past tense morphology.
Isabelle Buchstaller
  • Life-span trajectories in the realization of (ING): A dynamic perspective
  • Exploring the commemorative streetscape through time and space
Iulia Boldis
  • ’No vezi dialu ăla?/Do you see that hill?’ A sociolinguistics study on the functions and social impact of the discourse-pragmatic marker no
Ivan Šimko
  • Contact Tracing in Damaskini
James Grama
  • Life-span trajectories in the realization of (ING): A dynamic perspective
James Hawkey

James Hawkey is Senior Lecturer in Spanish and Catalan Linguistics at the University of Bristol, UK. His research focuses on issues in contemporary Catalan sociolinguistics, and his specific interests are in language variation and change, language policy and language attitudes. His work has appeared in the Journal of Sociolinguistics, Language Policy and the Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, among other publications. His recent monograph is Language Attitudes and Minority Rights: The Case of Catalan in France (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)

  • Multilingualism, Pluricentricity and the Search for Legitimacy: Discourses of Standardisation in Catalan- and Occitan-speaking France
Jan Gorisch

Jan is a phonetician who analyses phonation and the prosody in talk-in-interaction, performs corpus curation and corpus linguistics and develops tools to analyse regional variation.

  • Poster Session
Jan Höll

prae-doc at the department of German Studies at the University of Vienna and member in the SFB subproject PP08 (Standard varieties from the perspective of perceptual variationist linguistics) of the FWF Special Research Programme (SFB) ‘German in Austria. Variation – Contact –Perception’ (F60).

  • Negotiation of Standard Concepts in the Press Discourse of the Austrian Monarchy
Jan Luttenberger
  • Discussion
  • ‘Horizontal’ and ‘vertical’ varietal structures in Western Austria
Jan Messerli
  • Noun plural marking in Swiss German – a system in change?
  • Selecting representative survey sites from a large-scale dialectological study: A comparison of clustering methods
Jeffrey Pheiff
  • Variation and Change in the Morpho-Syntax of the Regional Languages of German
Jennifer-Carmen Frey
  • Dialect or not? How to identify the use of dialect in written online communication
Jenny Nilsson
  • The role of dialect in the era of standardisation – dialect shifts in interaction
Jens Lanwer
  • Reconstructing varieties from conversational data
Jeroen Darquennes
  • Towards a framework for the comparative study of minority language standardization
Johanna Fanta-Jende

... is currently a PhD student at the German Department of the University of Vienna, Austria, and part of the SFB project "German in Austria. Variation - Contact - Perception" (part PP03: Speech Repertoires and Varietal Spectra). Her research emphases lie on variationist linguistics and sociolinguistics of present-day German with a focus on phonetic-phonological variation within the dialect-standard-spectrum.

  • (Standard) German in Austria: Areal-horizontal and vertical-social variation ‘on the ground’
  • ‘Horizontal’ and ‘vertical’ varietal structures in Western Austria
Johanna Mechler
  • Age-based perception of linguistic variability in Tyneside English: Towards a lifespan perspective on language processing
  • Life-span trajectories in the realization of (ING): A dynamic perspective
Johanna Vaattovaara

Professor of Finnish language at Tampere University (Finland).
Research areas and interests:
Language awareness, ideologies and attitudes;
Linguistic variation and change
Educational sociolinguistics (University pedagogy of language teaching and learning, and beyond)
Science communication and popularization of science

  • Investigating ‘language regard’ through Exploratory Practice as a form of Citizen Science – insights from a case study
John Huisman
  • Using geographic regression to analyse linguistic diversity: The interplay of language-internal and -external factors
John Kirk

I have degrees from the University of Edinburgh (MA), Sheffield (PhD) and Queen's University Belfast (PGHET). I have held teaching and research positions at the University of Bonn, Sheffield, Queen's University Belfast, TU Dresden, and since 2018 as professor at the University of Vienna and since 2020 additionally as guest professor at Klagenfurt University. I have been a partner in the International Corpus of English project since its inception in 1989 and recently completed a major review of it. I compiled its all-Ireland component and went onto create a daughter corpus, the SPICE-Ireland Corpus, in which the data were pragmatically and prosodically annotated. As a corpus linguist and dialectologist, my research focuses in Scots and Scottish English, Irish English, and World Englishes.

  • The Digital Lexical Atlas of Scotland: Innovations in the Methodology for Researching the Vocabulary of Scots
Jokin Aiestaran
  • Stylistic management of Basque variation in Instagram: is there a weakening of standard language ideology?
Jon Morris
  • Stylistic variation and the possessive construction in Welsh
Jose A. Mompean

I work as a senior lecturer in English phonetics and phonology at the University of Murcia, Spain. As a researcher, I keep a wide view, combining topics, insights, and research methods from the fields of phonetics, phonology, cognitive linguistics, corpus linguistics, or L2 pronunciation research, among others.

  • A trend and panel study of GOOSE-fronting in Received Pronunciation
Josef Ruppenhofer
  • Devil in the details: Georeferencing the historical dialect corpora of German
Julia Ruck
  • Language Ideologies and Pluricentricity in German Foreign Language Teaching
Julia Snell
  • Discussion
  • Challenging views about nonstandard language in education to harness the power of talk for learning
Jutta Ransmayr
  • Conceptualisations of Austrian German among Austrian teachers and students
Karen V. Beaman

Karen V. Beaman is a lecturer and post-doctoral fellow in the Quantitative Linguistics department at Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, situated at the heart of her research site. Her primary research interests concern language variation, coherence and change in both apparent-time and real-time, with particular focus on how factors of identity, mobility and social networks drive or inhibit change. Her Ph.D. thesis was a comparative sociolinguistic study of Swabian, a dialect spoken in southwestern Germany, which combines a 35-year panel study with a four-generation trend study, investigating linguistic change across the community, as well as within the individual. She is also co-editor of three volumes published by Routledge: The Coherence of Linguistic Communities: Orderly Heterogeneity and Social Meaning (2022) (co-editor with Gregory R. Guy), Advancing Socio-Grammatical Variation: Sociolinguistic Research in Honour of Jenny Cheshire (2021) (co-editor with Isabelle Buchstaller, Sue Fox and James A. Walker), and Language Variation and Change across the Lifespan: Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives from Panel Studies (2021) (co-editor with Isabelle Buchstaller).

  • “wenn Ø bloß Schwäbisch kãsch” / ‘if you can only speak Swabian’: Null subjects in real- and apparent-time
Karlien Franco
  • Using geographic regression to analyse linguistic diversity: The interplay of language-internal and -external factors
Katharina Korecky-Kröll

Katharina Korecky-Kröll is a postdoc researcher in psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics at the Department of German Studies of the University of Vienna. Her main areas of research are adult production as well as child language acquisition (L1 and L2) of German in Austria on the basis of experimental data and spontaneous speech corpora, with a focus on morphology ond pragmatics.

  • (Standard) German in Austria: Areal-horizontal and vertical-social variation ‘on the ground’
  • Diminutive variation in rural Austria: evidence from experimental and naturalistic settings
Katharina Kranawetter
  • Austrian ‘shibboleths’ – Analyses on language use, attitudes and perception
Katharine Young

PhD student at Cardiff University

  • Stylistic variation and the possessive construction in Welsh
Katie Mansfield
  • Cognitive Load and Style Control: Examining the Role of Non-Standard Dialect Usage in Working-Class Children’s Educational Outcomes
Lars Bülow
  • Variation and change of constructions expressing adnominal possession in the dialects of Austria. Results of an indirect questionnaire study
  • Introduction
Laura Rosseel

Laura Rosseel is assistant professor in Dutch lanuage and linguistics at Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Her research interests mainly lie in the fields of (developmental) sociolinguistics, language variation and change, and experimental linguistics. Her PhD research focused on innovating the measurement of the social meaning of language variation. More specifically, she studied on a number of implicit attitude measures recently developed in social psychology and investigated whether it is possible to adapt these new attitude measures and use them to study language attitudes. In her current work, Laura is further applying these new methods to study the social meaning of language variation in various speech communities, as well as to measure the acquisition of language attitudes in children and adults.

  • What can big data tell us about the social meaning of language variation? A case study on socially meaningful spelling variation in English
  • Does 'he dived' take longer than 'he dove'? An experimental approach to iconicity in past tense morphology.
Laura Rupp
  • Beyond the NP-Pro constraint: factors governing the use of third person present tense zero in Norwich English
Lea Bauernfeind

Lea is a student assistant in the Sociolab led by Prof. Isabelle Buchstaller at the University of Duisburg-Essen. She is interested in language variation and change.

  • Life-span trajectories in the realization of (ING): A dynamic perspective
  • Poster Session
Leena Kolehmainen

Since 2017 Professor of German language at the University of Turku.

  • Varying voices: Constructing the making of German in higher education in Finland
Lieke Verheijen
  • Code-mixing in Dutch youths’ computer-mediated communication: Understanding the complexity and multifunctionality of English in Dutch CMC
Lisa Hilte
  • Communicating across educational boundaries: Accommodation patterns in adolescents' online interactions
Lisa Krammer
  • Perception of and attitudes towards standard and non-standard German in the context of teaching at Viennese universities
Ljubica Leone
  • Poster Session
Lorea Unamuno
  • Poster Session
Maggie Bullock

Maggie holds a master’s in applied linguistics from Georgia State University and has taught English for speakers of other languages for ten years. Maggie worked in the US as a college instructor and community organizer supporting adult immigrant education and refugee resettlement and integration. Most recently, she was a fellow at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin with the Collaborative Research Centre 1412 "Register" funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. She was affiliated with project C06 where she investigated the effects of power asymmetry and multilingualism on non-native addressee register.

  • Poster Session
Maike Rocker
  • Poster Session
Maitena Duhalde
  • Variation and change within a border area: the case of the Basque language
Maja Bitenc
  • Intralanguage and interlanguage variation and attitudes in Slovene cities
Manuel Raaf

Linguist and Software Developer

  • Unifying Heterogeneous Dialect Dictionaries Structures for Scientific and Laic Usage whilst Providing FAIR Data Principles
Maria Flaksman

Research assistant and PostDoc at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (Dep. Anglistik and Amerikanistik, Historical Linguistics and Medieval Literature), an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow; in 2015 defended the doctoral thesis ‘Diachronic development of English imitative vocabulary’ at the University of St. Petersburg; in 2017/18 studied Icelandic as a second language and Old Norse at the University of Iceland; author of the ‘Dictionary of English imitative words on historical principles’; the author and the chief coordinator of the Iconicity Atlas Project (http://www.iconicity-atlas.com).

  • Poster Session
Maria Schinko
  • Poster Session
Marie-Anne Morand

Currently, Morand is a postdoctoral researcher at the phonetics laboratory of Zurich University in the SNSF-project "Phonetic features of (multi-)ethnic urban vernaculars in German-speaking Switzerland".

  • Fricative duration in multiethnolectal Zurich German: A comparison between read and spontaneous speech
Marie-Luise Pitzl
  • Uncoupling variation and community: Multilingual individuals and Transient International Groups
Markus Kunzmann
  • Dialect/standard variety convergence along the German/Austrian border
Martin Fuchs

Martín Fuchs is a postdoctoral researcher in the Time in Translation NWO-funded project, which investigates crosslinguistic variation in Perfect constructions on the basis of parallel corpora data and experimental techniques.
Besides tense and aspect semantics, Martín is interested in context effects in language processing, ambiguity/vagueness resolution, and the cognitive underpinnings of semantic change.
Martín did his undergraduate studies at the Universidad de Buenos Aires (2013), and he obtained a PhD in Linguistics from Yale University in 2020.

  • Competing markers for the Progressive meaning: A diachronic corpus study of the Present Progressive and the Simple Present markers in Peninsular Spanish
  • Poster Session
María Ángeles Jurado-Bravo
  • Exploring the Levenshtein Distance as a measure of intelligibility of foreign accents
Massimo Cerruti
  • Discussion
  • Social variation in spoken Italian: the case of the subjunctive
  • Italiano popolare: the distinctiveness of an obsolescing variety
Matt Hunt Gardner

Matt Hunt Gardner is a post-doctoral researcher working at KU Leuven, Belgium. Matt is a trained variationist sociolinguist and is currently exploring the connections between grammatical variability and speech processing.

  • Grammatical variation and, uh, cognitive load: Not so correlated
Matthew Hadodo

Matthew John Hadodo recently completed his PhD in sociolinguistics at the University of Pittsburgh focusing on language and identity, and started a postdoctoral position at the University of Bern's Center for the Study of Language and Society. His work encompasses variationist and discursive approaches to how people use language in relation to how they view themselves and others. I mostly focus on the endangered Istanbul Greek dialect, and balance ethnographic fieldwork with sociophonetic approaches to studying language contact and change.

  • Double Standards? Stigmatization and Prestige in Istanbul Greek
Matthias Hahn
  • Spatial Tendencies of Assimilation in German
Matthias Hüning

Matthias Hüning is a full professor for Dutch linguistics at Freie Universität Berlin. More information can be found on his website.

  • The Sprachmeister as “foreign language maker” in early modern Europe: the making of French and Dutch for German-speaking learners
Max Reuvers
  • Methods for analysing vowel formant change in transmasculine speakers during hormone replacement therapy
Małgorzata Fabiszak
  • Exploring the commemorative streetscape through time and space
Melanie Studerus
  • Poster Session
  • Noun plural marking in Swiss German – a system in change?
  • Selecting representative survey sites from a large-scale dialectological study: A comparison of clustering methods
Melanie Weirich
  • Register Differences in Vowel Dispersion in Formal and Informal Situations
Melissa Bruno
  • Fricative duration in multiethnolectal Zurich German: A comparison between read and spontaneous speech
Melissa Farasyn

I am a postdoctoral researcher of the Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO), affiliated with Ghent University and KU Leuven. My research concerns syntactic variation and change in unstandardised Germanic varieties.

  • ‘Wel’ is doing well: competition in the West Flemish community of practice
Melissa Schuring

PhD researcher @KU Leuven, QLVL, working on Project OMG.

https://www.melissaschuring.com/

  • On the emergence and development of English as a youth language marker
  • Poster Session
Mercedes Durham

I'm a Reader of Sociolinguistics at Cardiff University. My research focuses on the acquisition of variation (in children and L2 speakers), accents and dialects of English (esp. in Scotland and Wales) and language attitudes.

  • Stylistic variation and the possessive construction in Welsh
Mieke Van Herreweghe
  • Constituent order in Serbian Sign Language
Mihaela Mocanu
  • Poster Session
Miklós Németh
  • Continuity or discontinuity in dialect use: When the speech of the son is more dialectal than his mother’s
Mirjam Eiswirth
  • Life-span trajectories in the realization of (ING): A dynamic perspective
Monika Dannerer
  • Variation and Belonging. The Use of Variation in Tourism for Indicating Forms of Belonging
Myriam Vermeerbergen
  • Constituent order in Serbian Sign Language
Nadja Kerschhofer-Puhalo

Post-doctoral researcher in Applied Linguistics, Department of Linguistics, University of Vienna
PI Literacies and Multilingualism Research Group
https://literacies.univie.ac.at/

  • “Gemma Kino?!” – “Let’s go change?” The non-use of prepositions as indexical sign in the socio-semiotic landscape
Nantke Pecht

Dr. Nantke Pecht is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Her main interests are in the field of sociolinguistics, morphosyntax, corpus linguistics, and language variation and change.

  • Poster Session
  • Dutch-German Language Contact in a Mining Community
Naomi Nagy

Naomi Nagy is a Professor of Linguistics at the University of Toronto. She received her Ph.D. in Linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania in 1996, writing a dissertation about language contact and its effects on Faetar, a Francoprovençal dialect spoken in a village in southern Italy, supervised by Gillian Sankoff.

Her primary research project now analyzes variation and change in ten heritage languages spoken in Toronto (http://ngn.artsci.utoronto.ca/HLVC), including comparison to homeland varieties, examination of the effects of ethnic orientation, and pedagogical components to train researchers to conduct variationist analyses of less-codified varieties.

She has published in Heritage Language Journal, International Journal of the Sociology of Language, Journal of Sociolinguistics, Language and Communication, Language Documentation and Conservation, Language Variation and Change, Lingua, and Linguistic Vanguard.

More about her projects and a full list of publications and upcoming presentations is at: http://individual.utoronto.ca/ngn.

  • Lexical frequency effects in Italian VOT: Minority vs. Majority language effects
  • Prodrop in Six Languages: Very similar and not influenced by English contact
Nathalie Fromm
  • Diachronic development of the weak feminine declension in German vernaculars
Nicola Klingler
  • Revisiting Pfalz's data and results on the timing of vowel and consonant sequences in Central Bavarian using contemporary phonetic methods
Nina Sternitzke
  • Cross-linguistic areal patterns in non-standard grammar: Northern Germany and the Nordics
Oliver Currie

Oliver Currie is an assistant professor in the Department of English and American Studies at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. He has research interests in the fields of historical linguistics, sociolinguistics and translation studies, with a focus on Welsh, English and French. His recent and current research includes work on word order variation and change in Welsh, the sixteenth century Welsh Bible translations, national myths and language status in early modern Wales and Brittany as well as on language controversies surrounding the collection and translation of folktales in the nineteenth century. He did a BA in Anglo Saxon, Norse and Celtic and Modern and Medieval Languages then an MPhil Linguistics at the University of Cambridge and completed his PhD in Linguistics at the University of Ljubljana on the development of verb-initial word order in Early Modern Welsh.

  • Individual style as a factor in syntactic variation and change
Olivia Walsh

Olivia Walsh is Associate Professor in French and Francophone Studies at the University of Nottingham, UK. Her research interests include linguistic ideologies and language attitudes in French, in particular linguistic purism in France and Quebec, standardisation and prescriptivism in France and the French-speaking world, the French-speaking community in the UK and the USA, language contact and historical sociolinguistics. Her work has appeared in the Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development and the Journal of French Language Studies, amongst other publications. Her recent monograph is Linguistic Purism: Language Attitudes in France and Quebec (John Benjamins, 2016).

  • French Language Columns and ‘Le bon usage’: Attitudes towards Standard and Non-Standard Usages in 20th-Century France
Pamela Goryczka

I am a PhD student in Romance linguistics at the University of Vienna. Currently, I am mostly interested in morphology and its interfaces with syntax, phonology and semantics. In my dissertation, I am investigating morphosyntactic deficits in the verbal domain related to Italian speakers with Broca’s aphasia.
My research interests also include syntactic and morphological variation in German varieties. Prior to my current research goals, as a student assistant within the FWF Special Research Programme (SFB) ‘German in Austria. Variation – Contact – Perception', I also worked on adnominal possessive constructions in the context of my Master's thesis.

  • Pragmatics is key: A multidimensional analysis of adnominal possession in Austria
Panayiotis Pappas

My main research interests lie in language variation, historical linguistics, sociolinguistics and Greek dialectology. Overall, I seek to understand how language changes from both a structural and a societal perspective. I have pursued these interests mostly in the exploration of Greek dialectology, but also in the study of immigrant languages in Canada.

  • On the cusp: Greek language maintenance and postvernacularity in Western Canada
  • Insights into the development of lateral palatalization from the Greek of Greek-Canadians
Patryk Dobkiewicz
  • Exploring the commemorative streetscape through time and space
Paul Cooper
  • Scouse in school: enregisterment of Liverpool English and dominant language ideologies at the Wirral
Paz González
  • Poster Session
Peter Gilles
  • Analysing acoustic vowel dynamics in crowd-sourced data: Ongoing sound changes in Luxembourgish
Philip Vergeiner
  • ‘Horizontal’ and ‘vertical’ varietal structures in Western Austria
  • Pragmatics is key: A multidimensional analysis of adnominal possession in Austria
Philipp Krämer

Interim professor of linguistics

  • Competing Contributions to Language Making: Learners of Spanish in Berlin
Pia Quist

Professor of sociolinguistics and dialectology, University of Copenhagen

  • Urban peasants and fishmongers – how rural dialects remained ‘in business’ in inner-city Copenhagen
Péter Jeszenszky
  • Poster Session
  • Noun plural marking in Swiss German – a system in change?
Péter Jeszenszky
  • Selecting representative survey sites from a large-scale dialectological study: A comparison of clustering methods
Rachel Byrne
  • Scouse in school: enregisterment of Liverpool English and dominant language ideologies at the Wirral
Rafael Orozco

Professor of Linguistics and Spanish; Director of Louisiana State University’s Interdepartmental Linguistics Program. Scholarly interests include sociolinguistics with emphases on language variation and change in Latin American Spanish, and Spanish in the United States. His research studies the factors that condition language variation including the effects of language contact —mainly with English— and dialectal contact on Latin American Spanish. Recent work explores the idiosyncratic lexical effects of the verb on personal pronoun expression. Has delivered presentations in the United States, Canada, Europe, New Zealand, and South America. Author of Spanish in Colombia & New York City: Language Contact Meets Dialectal Convergence (John Benjamins, 2018); editor of New Directions in Hispanic Linguistics (Cambridge Scholars, 2014); coeditor of Subject Pronoun Expression in Spanish: A Cross-Dialectal Perspective (Georgetown, 2015). His work has appeared in several edited collections and in journals such as Spanish in Context, Hispania, and Studies in Hispanic and Lusophone Linguistics.

  • Beyond Verb Type: The Effect of the Verb on Subject Pronoun Expression
Raoul Buurke

I am a PhD candidate at the Center for Language and Cognition Groningen. In my work I focus on recent phonetic change of Dutch dialects and their speakers, for which I employ large-scale statistical models on phonetic transcriptions.

  • Poster Session
Reinhild Vandekerckhove
  • Communicating across educational boundaries: Accommodation patterns in adolescents' online interactions
Remco Knooihuizen
  • Methods for analysing vowel formant change in transmasculine speakers during hormone replacement therapy
Rena Torres Cacoullos
  • Frequency and the role of constructions in variable subject expression
Rita Stiglbauer
  • Austrian ‘shibboleths’ – Analyses on language use, attitudes and perception
  • The Role of the Factors "Proximity" and "Distance" for the Evaluation of Dialects in Austria
Rob Drummond
  • Social Meaning in Archival Interaction: A mixed-methods analysis of variation in rhoticity and past tense BE in Oldham
Robert Lange
  • Poster Session
Roeland van Hout
  • Using geographic regression to analyse linguistic diversity: The interplay of language-internal and -external factors
  • Code-mixing in Dutch youths’ computer-mediated communication: Understanding the complexity and multifunctionality of English in Dutch CMC
Sabine Wahl
  • Historical Dialect Dictionaries and Their Corpora as Data Basis for Language Variation – a Multimedia Tour of the WBÖ and its Research Platform LIÖ
Sabrina Goll
  • Cross-linguistic areal patterns in non-standard grammar: Northern Germany and the Nordics
Sadie Ryan
  • Social Meaning in Archival Interaction: A mixed-methods analysis of variation in rhoticity and past tense BE in Oldham
Salina Cuddy

Salina is an early career research who focuses on language and identity. In particular, she is interested in gender, sexuality, and sport and how these may interact. She recently finished her PhD at the University of York and has been a Teaching Associate in Variationist Sociolinguistics at the University of Sheffield.

  • Perceptions of female sexual orientation: F0 perceptions and the importance of listener identity
Samantha Link
  • Differences in vowel quantity among German Dialects
Sandra Jansen
  • A trend and panel study of GOOSE-fronting in Received Pronunciation
Sandra Schwab
  • Fricative duration in multiethnolectal Zurich German: A comparison between read and spontaneous speech
Sandra Widmer Beierlein
  • Picture Naming in Swiss Bivarietal Speakers
  • Poster Session
Sara Arndt
  • Category-specific conjunctions in a European minority language
Seraina Nadig
  • Fricative duration in multiethnolectal Zurich German: A comparison between read and spontaneous speech
Seraphim Alvanides
  • Exploring the commemorative streetscape through time and space
Sergio Monforte

Lecturer of the Department of Basque Language and Communication at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU). I defended my thesis in 2020 at the University of the Basque Country under the supervision of Xabier Artiagoitia (UPV/EHU). Basque language, microvariation, syntactic theory, modal particles and their pragmatics are my research interests. My current work focuses on the syntax of modal particles in Basque considering cross-linguistic and historical data.

  • Variation and change within a border area: the case of the Basque language
Silvia Ballarè
  • Discussion
  • Social variation in spoken Italian: the case of the subjunctive
Simon Kasper
  • Variation and Change in the Morpho-Syntax of the Regional Languages of German
Simon Oppermann

I am a PhD student at Leipzig University. My research interests are mainly concerned with sociolinguistics and language variation, with a particular interest in phonetics and phonology.

  • Life span change – insights from a panel study in East Middle German
Sofia Lampropoulou

I am a senior lecturer in English Language at the University of Liverpool. My research interests lie at the interface of Sociolinguistics and Critical Discourse Analysis. I am interested in social, race and gender (in) equalities and the ways language is used to sustain or challenge such inequalities. Another strand of my research deals with speaker identity construction in relation to the local and the wider sociocultural contexts of interactions. I have investigated these issues in educational contexts, public documents, media representations, interviews and conversational narratives.

  • Scouse in school: enregisterment of Liverpool English and dominant language ideologies at the Wirral
Spiros A. Moschonas
  • Variation with and without prescriptivism: The case of the Greek word for ‘coronavirus’
Stavros Bompolas

Stavros Bompolas is a PhD Candidate in Linguistics in the Department of Philology at the University of Patras. He has a BA Honours and a Master’s degree from the same Department. Moreover, he is a member of the Laboratory of Modern Greek Dialects (LMGD), University of Patras.

In his PhD dissertation, he is studying the dialectometric/atlantometric methods used in the fields of Computational Dialectology and Geolinguistics, supervised by prof. Angela Ralli (University of Patras), assoc. prof. Dimitra Melissaropoulou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki) and prof. Walter Daelemans (University of Antwerp). He is also awarded with "Andreas Mentzelopoulos Scholarships for Postgraduate Studies at the University of Patras" (2020-2022).

For more information, please visit: https://upatras.academia.edu/stavros_bompolas

  • Detecting spatial effects of contact-induced vs. language-internal variation: a dialectometric approach to Cappadocian Greek
Stavroula Tsiplakou

Stavroula Tsiplakou is Associate Professor of Linguistics and Academic Co-ordinator of the M.A. programme in Greek Linguistics and Literature. She holds a B.A. in Greek Literature from the University of Athens, An M.Phil. in Linguistics from the University of Cambridge and a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. Prior to her appointment at the Open University of Cyprus in 2010 she taught at the University of Hull (1995-1998), at Simon Fraser University (1998-2001) and at the University of Cyprus (2001-2009). Her research areas include syntax, pragmatics, text linguistics, sociolinguistics and educational linguistics. She has published o Lingua, Linguistic Inquiry, Pragmatics, Journal of Pragmatics, Multilingua, Linguistics and Education. She has co-edited Current Issues in Educational Linguistics, Language Variation: European Perspectives ΙΙ and Intermediate varieties: Koinai and Regional Standards in Europe. She has co-authored national curricula for language in Cyprus and in Greece and she has produced digital platforms for teaching Greek as a second language. She is on the editorial board of Polydromo, a journal for multilingual education. She is Principal Investigator in two research projects (Mapping the Linguistic Landscape of Cyprus και From Diglossia to Diaglossia) and has presented over 150 papers in international conferences.

  • Capitalizing on nonstandard varieties for critical literacy in the face of diglossia.
Stefan Grondelaers

STEFAN GRONDELAERS is a senior researcher and lecturer at the Centre for Language Studies of the Radboud University, Nijmegen, the Netherlands. With Dirk Speelman (University of Leuven), Grondelaers has confronted laboratory experiments and corpus analysis in multivariate studies of syntactic variation. After joining the research group Variation and Distance at the Radboud University in 2007, Grondelaers has focused on the attitudinal and ideological correlates of (especially syntactic) variation and change processes in Belgian and Netherlandic Dutch.

  • Discussion
  • Macho or hipster? Pinpointing the essence of dynamic prestige in an advertising experiment.
Stefan Michael Newerkla

... is Professor of West Slavic Linguistics at the Department of Slavic Languages of the University of Vienna. His work focuses on language contact in the past and present, combining research methods and insights from (historical) sociolinguistics, geolinguistics, language typology and other disciplines (history, sociology).

  • Austria as a showcase of internal and external multilingualism. Old and new linguistic frontiers.
Stefania Marzo

Stefania Marzo is Associate Professor of Italian Linguistics at the University of Leuven. Her research interests broadly fall into the area of variationist sociolinguistics and contact linguistics. She focuses specifically on the diffusion of urban vernaculars in Flanders, on contact and leveling in heritage Italian in Europe, and on the dynamics of (re)standardization in Italy. On a methodological level, she combines corpus-based production research with experimental methods in order to investigate the social meaning of language variation.

  • Coherence and lexical variation in Neostandard Italian: A sociolectrometric analysis
Stefanie Jannedy
  • Register Differences in Vowel Dispersion in Formal and Informal Situations
Stefano De Pascale
  • Coherence and lexical variation in Neostandard Italian: A sociolectrometric analysis
Steffen Höder
  • Cross-linguistic areal patterns in non-standard grammar: Northern Germany and the Nordics
Stephan Elspaß

... is Professor of German Linguistics at the University of Salzburg. His work focuses on language variation and change, German dialectology, and historical sociolinguistics, with a special interest in language history 'from below', the effects of standardisation, and language ideologies (on German and in a comparative view).

  • Discussion
  • Austria as a showcase of internal and external multilingualism. Old and new linguistic frontiers.
Stephan Schmid
  • Fricative duration in multiethnolectal Zurich German: A comparison between read and spontaneous speech
Susanne Oberholzer
  • Interplay of accommodation and place loyalty
Teodora Vuković

Teodora Vuković is a corpus linguist focusing on linguistic variation in South Slavic varieties and quantitative and computational approaches to the vertical and horizontal diffusion of linguistic features. She is writing her doctoral dissertation at the University of Zurich, within the Horizon 2020 project TraCeBa – (Dis-)entangling Traditions on the Central Balkans: Performance and Perception.

  • Degrees of non-standardness. Feature-based analysis of variation in a Torlak dialect corpus
Thodoris Paraskevas
  • Variation with and without prescriptivism: The case of the Greek word for ‘coronavirus’
Thomas Schmidt
  • Devil in the details: Georeferencing the historical dialect corpora of German
  • Poster Session
Timo Schürmann
  • Reconstructing varieties from conversational data
Truus De Wilde
  • The making of Dutch at universities extra muros: a teachers‘ perspective
Ulrike Vogl
  • The Sprachmeister as “foreign language maker” in early modern Europe: the making of French and Dutch for German-speaking learners
Unn Røyneland

Professor of Scandinavian Linguistics and Deputy Director of MultiLing, Center for Multilingualism in Society across the Lifespan. My fields of expertise include dialectology, language attitudes and ideologies, language policy and planning, and digitally-mediated communication. My most recent research focuses on the ontological status and enregisterment of regional and standard varieties, dialect acquisition in migratory context, multilectal practices online, and online and offline propagation and contestation of multiethnolectal speech styles.

  • Voices of Authority: Perceptions of ‘Dialect’ and ‘Standard’ among young Norwegians
Verena Sauer
  • Meissen or Vienna? – A framesemantic approach to the historical language standardization discourse in the 18th century.
Veronica Olariu

Senior Researcher
Dialectology and Sociolinguistic Department
The “A.Philippide” Institute of Romanian Philology
Romanian Academy

  • The Audio-Visual Linguistic Atlas of Bukovina (ALAB) – a multidimensional platform for analising Romanian dialectal variation
Veronika Thir
  • Modelling phonological intelligibility in English as a lingua franca communication: the contribution of co-text, context and various listener factors
Violetta Cataldo
  • The intonation of neighboring varieties in Campania
Vytautas Kardelis
  • The Structure of Diatopic Variations in the Lithuanian Language
Wendy Elvira-García

Wendy Elvira-García is a phonetics researcher working with a postdoc fellowship "Juan de la Cierva" in the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (Spain) and a member of the Phonetics Laboratory "Antonio Quilis".

  • Women use sustained pitch more than men in Spanish
Wilbert Heeringa

See: http://www.wjheeringa.nl/papers/ .

  • Poster Session
  • A comparison of contemporary normalization methods for time-dynamic vowels
Wolfgang Koppensteiner
  • Approaching 'standardness' from a perceptual perspective: Results from Austria
Xanthi Katsanta

Surname: Katsanta
Occupation: Teacher in Secondary Education
Email: xanthi.katsanta@gmail.com

Education

2017-present: PhD candidate in Linguistics, Department of Linguistics, University of Patras.
2012-2015: MA in Greek Language and Literature, Open University of Cyprus.
1994-1999: Bachelor in Law Studies, Department of Law Studies, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens.
1984-1990: Bachelor in Psychology, Department of Philosophy, Pedagogy and Psychology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens.

Languages
Greek: native speaker.
English: proficient speaker.
French: good working knowledge.

Computer skills
Holder of ECDL CORE.

Work experience
2000-2008: I practised law in a private practice.
2008-present: I teach the module «Social Education» to secondary education students.

Conferences
2019 Conference presentation entitled: «The phenomenon of vowel raising in the dialect of the city of Agrinio: levelling due to the contact of dialects in the Dialect of Agrinio», 14th International Conference of Greek Linguistics, ICGL 14, 5-8 September 2019, Patras, Greece.
2019 Conference presentation entitled: «Using art as a tool to transform perceptions of refugees», 4th Panhellenic Conference Education in the 21st century: Education and Civilization, May 2019, Athens, Greece.

2016 Conference presentation entitled: «The deletion of the unstressed vowels /i/ and /u/ in the dialect of Agrinio city», 7th International Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic theory, 6-8 October 2016, Rethymno, Greece.

Publications
«The Deletion of Unstressed vowels /i u/ in the Dialect of Agrinio City», Proceedings of the 7th Ιnternational Conference on Modern Greek Dialects and Linguistic Theory, MGDLT 7, Rethymno, 6-8 October 2016, Volume Editors Ioanna Kappa, Marina Tzakosta, p.p. 95-105.

  • The morphophonological personal pronoun variable (tin)of the South-Greek dialect of Agrinio: acoustic analysis within the framework of Dialect Contact
Yosiane White
  • Why are -ing and -in’ processed differently? Exploring a processing asymmetry between canonical and noncanonical variants